Montessori Music Activities For the First Week of School!

A FAMILIAR SONG, SWEET SOUNDING MARACAS, AND WALKING ON THE "MONTESSORI LINE" BRING MUSICAL FUN TO THE FIRST DAYS OF SCHOOL IN THE MONTESSORI CLASSROOM!



For many, the school year is starting up, and Montessori classrooms are welcoming children with some fun new, and some old, familiar activities.

Bringing music to the first experiences that children will be having is a wonderful way to begin the process of becoming a little Montessori learning community!


FIVE GREEN SPECKLED FROGS
LANGUAGE ARTS ACTIVITY
The children in my groups have always enjoyed this shelf work that has a lovely little replica of a "pond" along with 5 green speckled frogs, a "log," and even some bugs!

The "pond" is a handmade model of a pond that I found in a thrift store, and it makes a lovely setting for a child to arrange the log, the frogs and the bugs while singing the familiar children's song, "Five Green Speckled Frogs."

You could also simply laminate a photo of a pond and use that instead of a wooden model of a pond.

Here's a link to listen to or download the song:
Harlesden Music Man, 5 Green & Speckled Frogs 

After the first few days, I have sometimes added "water pouring" to this work, so that the child can fill up the pond! Before we know it, we've introduced a Practical Life Activity to this fun musical experience!

For an enrichment to the Language Arts of this activity, I've printed out the words to the song, laminated it, and then placed it on the tray for the child to "read"  (and sing) while manipulating the little objects.


EXPLORING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
TO DEVELOP THE MUSCLES OF THE HAND
These pleasant sounding maracas (called Chiquitas) can be placed in a basket on the Music Shelf so that two children can make music together at work time during the first days of school.

They have a quieter sound than regular maracas, so that they aren't disturbing to the other children. They also provide lots of small motor practice for the child when gripping the handle to shake and make a sound!


WALKING ON THE MONTESSORI LINE
IN A MUSICAL WAY

Walking on the Line, of course, aids the child in developing coordination and when music is added there is an element of focused listening that enhances the cognitive development in the child.

Sometimes, I have set up a permanent Montessori Line, and at other times, I have provided a length of rope so that a child can set up their own Line to practice walking along during work time. Just put on some circus style tight rope walking music and the children have great fun walking along this "tight rope Line"! 

CLOSELY SUPERVISE children at all times when ropes are being used.

I have included all of these sweet and simple activities (and more!) in the first lessons of my upcoming on-line eCourse, Musically Montessori: First Twelve Weeks.



You can also get lots of ideas for getting your Montessori music curriculum off to a great start with my eBook, Musically Montessori: First Lessons.

If you haven't already done so, you can sign up for my email list and get my eBook for free (retail value: $12.99)! The sign up is on the sidebar of this blog.

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I would love to hear about the musical activities you are offering your group during the first days/ weeks of school. Please feel free to comment in the section below. I always read comments and really enjoy hearing your ideas!

Don't miss the wonderful resources at the Living Montessori Now site. This article is part of the "Montessori Monday Link-up" along with many other articles from Montessorians world wide. Here is that link: Montessori Monday.

I am no longer an Amazon Affiliate and I DO NOT receive compensations from Amazon or any other product vendors. The links to various products in this Blog are ones that I use myself and are for your own reference and convenience. 








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2 comments :

  1. The Montessori Method has had its share of criticism. Some parents believe the classroom environment is "too free", while others question Montessori teaching priorities, or the fact that children are not normally assigned homework.

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    1. Yes, you are so right, Isabelle, and it does seem to ebb and flow! Personally, I am delighted with so much information on the internet now that helps de-mystify Montessori and gives more accessibility to the method. I think that educating people who don't know much about the Montessori rationale is the best avenue to take. That "homework" thing is such a stickler!

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